How to pour and serve red wine in restaurants, hotels

How to pour red wine properly

Clean the bottle

After opening the red wine button, you should use a towel to wipe off any dirt or debris left in the bottle, avoiding falling into the wine.

Pour wine into a glass

You need to carefully hold the wine bottle with the palm of your hand, so guide the wine label on the client so that they can see the wine bottle information. When filling, you close the bottle near the mouth but do not touch the glass, start pouring the wine from the middle of the glass, then bring the bottle up slowly.

At about ½ cup, you rotate the bottleneck gently to the left or right, from the bottle top to avoid distortion on the table. While pouring, you avoid shaking your hands so that the residue in the alcohol can emerge.

Continue to clean the bottle

After pouring, you continue to wipe the wipes again to avoid the drops of wine can also create a stain on the bottle

Process of serving red wine

Prepare wine glasses

Before having your glasses set on a table or table, you must check for any stains or dust remaining on the glass. Make sure that the cup is clean, transparent, or can be placed in a reasonable position on the table.

Introduce wine to guests

When introducing the wine, you must turn the label to the customer, clearly present the origin, the type of wine and the year of manufacture of the wine. Next, you will be introduced to the taste and characteristics of the wine. Then please allow guests to open the wine.

Red wine needs to be opened before drinking for 15-30 minutes to let the yeast escape, the reaction between oxygen and alcohol will help to taste better wine.

In case you have chosen your favorite wine, you do not need to introduce a bottle of wine, just bring the wine and open the wine in front of guests.

Open the cork

Use a small knife to cut a tin ring of the bottle and remove lightly. Then use the wine opener to open the cork, after opening you put the cork button on a plate on the table for guests to check.

Drinking alcohol and pouring wine

When you try the wine, you pour a glass of wine to the owner of the table or the caller and invite guests to try wine. After the wine is finished, you ask for the remaining guests at the table in the order of women first, male after. On how to red wine properly, you follow the steps above.

Next drink

If you have drunk alcohol in the glass, you must actively pour more wine for guests, only stop serving when asked to stop. When you have poured all the wine in the bottle, you have to ask the owner of the party whether to add wine or not. If guests call a different wine, all glass on the table for guests. You can not pour two different kinds of wine into the same glass, which will confuse the taste of the wine.Some note when serving red wine

The standard red wine serving temperature ranges from 16 to 18 degrees Celsius. In summer, you need to soak in cold ice for 5 to 10 minutes before serving. Also in the winter, you can serve directly without cold soaking.

► Do not soak cold red wine in ice for a long time as it will damage the aroma of the wine.

► When you call red wine, you should remind guests not to use salad dressing vinegar oil.

Getting my glamour on with Toni & Gu

My hair, it has been a journey ever since my last perm in my teens to win that volume back without having to look like something taken from a fashion magazine a la 80’s. I’m Swedish and have inherited the hair of my country, fine, fragile and super soft, and I admit, with the help of occasional highlights, I remain as blonde as I was in my youth. toni and guyI have tried products to give that va va voom volume. Shampoo’s promising noticeable bounce from first use to hot rollers giving me volume that will last me until, well realistically, lunch. Cans of hairspray to keep it all intact, and my own trick, the back combing. It’s a lot of work just to get that lush volume. Mini crimping my roots which allows me to have my hair let down up to one day after wash without my ears piercing through it like those of elves. Cute yes, on a child. So imagine my smiles and hopes when I received the Toni & Guy Glamour Jumbo Tong in the post. What will this bring I wondered. I googled some tricks on how to curl my hair, found many very complicated videos and tutorials, with that I decided to venture into this on my own. I have used a bigger barreled tong like this back in the day but I didn’t get the hang out of it then. I now know that that was all due to me not doing it right, it’s all about the angle of the tong. So I have now learned after some attempts that I get the best result for my length and thickness of hair and to give the effect I want is by holding it horizontally, it makes such a big difference! So what makes this one so special you wonder. One thing I noticed that really did it for me is that the heat setting has a wider range to work for all types of hair, with my fine hair this is so important as it gets damaged so easily. The tongs heats up very fast so there’s no need to wait. It has a ceramic tourmaline coated barrel, which means it gives the hair a shinier and healthier looking finish. Also it has a cool tip, which is so very important, the amount of times I have burnt myself on hot tools when magically trying to create my dream volume is ridiculous. So I am super happy about this feature. I feel however I need to mention that this size tong will give you loose curls or waves so don’t expect to get a massive amount of strong curls, that’s not what it’s for, and if that’s what you want you need a smaller barrel. This beauty will give you glamorous and sultry curls or waves, and that was exactly what I have been in search for all these years! The Toni & Guy Glamour Jumbo Tong is available online and in retailers nationwide.

My hair, it has been a journey ever since my last perm in my teens to win that volume back without having to look like something taken from a fashion magazine a la 80’s. I’m Swedish and have inherited the hair of my country, fine, fragile and super soft, and I admit, with the help of occasional highlights, I remain as blonde as I was in my youth.

I have tried products to give that va va voom volume. Shampoo’s promising noticeable bounce from first use to hot rollers giving me volume that will last me until, well realistically, lunch. Cans of hairspray to keep it all intact, and my own trick, the back combing. It’s a lot of work just to get that lush volume. Mini crimping my roots which allows me to have my hair let down up to one day after wash without my ears piercing through it like those of elves. Cute yes, on a child.

So imagine my smiles and hopes when I received the Toni & Guy Glamour Jumbo Tong in the post. What will this bring I wondered. I googled some tricks on how to curl my hair, found many very complicated videos and tutorials, with that I decided to venture into this on my own.

I have used a bigger barreled tong like this back in the day but I didn’t get the hang out of it then. I now know that that was all due to me not doing it right, it’s all about the angle of the tong. So I have now learned after some attempts that I get the best result for my length and thickness of hair and to give the effect I want is by holding it horizontally,  it makes such a big difference!

So what makes this one so special you wonder.

One thing I noticed that really did it for me is that the heat setting has a wider range to work for all types of hair, with my fine hair this is so important as it gets damaged so easily. The tongs heats up very fast so there’s no need to wait. It has a ceramic tourmaline coated barrel, which means it gives the hair a shinier and healthier looking finish. Also it has a cool tip, which is so very important, the amount of times I have burnt myself on hot tools when magically trying to create my dream volume is ridiculous. So I am super happy about this feature.

I feel however I need to mention that this size tong will give you loose curls or waves so don’t expect to get a massive amount of strong curls, that’s not what it’s for, and if that’s what you want you need a smaller barrel.

This beauty will give you glamorous and sultry curls or waves, and that was exactly what I have been in search for all these years!

The Toni & Guy Glamour Jumbo Tong is available online and in retailers nationwide.

What visions in the Dark of light ! Samuel Beckett Trilogy

What visions in the Dark of light ! Samuel Beckett Trilogy

Samuel Beckett is often considered one of the most influential writers in recent history and his avant garde and minimalist works are perfect subjects for the progressive approach of the Royal Court Theatre, where Not I was first performed forty years ago and to which it returned last year. Having come to the end of its run there, the show recently moved to the Duchess Theatre in the West End and two more short pieces were added, Footfalls and Rockaby, all performed as a one-woman show by Irish actress Lisa Dwan.

Known for his bleak outlook, Beckett’s plays will probably not provide the feel-good family experience that most tourists look for in the West End, nor is it a great show for a first date – you might be better off reserving this type of play for someone you already know to have an interest in theatre. It might also be advisable to avoid this production if you’re scared of the dark… However, with these caveats established, I would strongly recommend this to newcomers to Beckett, as well as those who are familiar with his work.

Not I, written in 1972, features an illuminated female mouth that seems to float, disembodied, above the stage, while the entire auditorium is in complete darkness. This is no exaggeration; emergency exit lights are switched off and it was impossible to see the heads of those in front of me! The text centres on a woman’s repression of an event that has caused her to begin her rushing verbosity after a lengthy period of mutism, but leaves some doubt as to what the specifics of this event might have been. Lisa Dwan tackles this challenging performance with confidence, having received coaching in the role from Billie Whitelaw, who herself received substantial training from Beckett himself. The breathless speed-of-thought performance is unsettling and, although there are just four movements written into the script, the effect of having the mouth as a single point of light in the dark is swaying vertigo.

Director Walter Asmus, a long-time friend of Beckett, has remained faithful to the original in-text directions, working with lighting designer James Farncombe and sound designer David McSeveney, to create the most minimalistic effects that really focus on the character. In the second piece, Footfalls, the room remains in relative darkness, with only a dim glow around the white-clad character of May and some minimal illumination of Lisa Dwan’s face when she turned to the audience to speak. May paces back and forth across the stage, her very footfalls dictated by Beckett in his notes, pausing only to have a conversation with her dying mother, also voiced by Dwan, who is apparently offstage and who may already be dead, or even an invention of May’s mind. Although Footfalls describes the relationship between mother and daughter, May’s ghostly appearance and metronomic pacing recall to mind the hysteric of early psychology and evoke mesmeric focus in the audience.

The final piece, Rockaby, is popular among Beckett’s later works and features an older woman in evening dress, seated in a rocking chair. Again, the lights remained low for this section, allowing Dwan’s face to disappear completely when she leant backwards on the chair, leaving only her hands brightly illuminated as they gripped the chair arms. Dwan’s pre-recorded voice is the only sound throughout most of the piece, although there are some specific lines spoken live as well. The circular nature of the monologue acts like a lullaby which describes details from the life of the character and which seems to be accompanying the characters final decline to death. The monotone voice acts on the audience too, and you can feel yourself being lulled by the tone, even if you are aware of the frightening emptiness of meaning that is attached to this woman’s last moments.

Between the three short pieces, the thread that runs between them is the theme of movement, specifically movement which is at once futile and absurd, with the disembodied mouth, the pacing and the rocking. The audience is left with a sense of movement that persists when they leave the theatre, a strange swaying motion that might mark the passing of time or an impending totter towards insanity. Lisa Dwan manages to occupy the perfect liminal position, between embodiment of character and departure from realism, that characterises Beckett’s work and the characters are tragic and comic simultaneously, the ridiculousness of their situations allowing us to laugh at their despair.

The trilogy will be at the Duchess Theatre until February 15th 2014, with tickets available from the Royal Court website. Whether you want to see Beckett performed as he himself intended or you have never seen any Beckett before – and if you are able to stand the dark – you will certainly find this production illuminating.

Sunday Funday at Chai Wu

Sunday Funday at Chai Wu

Sunday Funday at Chai Wu Sunday Funday at Chai Wu  Sunday Funday at Chai WuSunday Funday at Chai WuSunday Funday at Chai Wu